Precious water

Many people cannot take the purity of their water for granted. The Freudenberg Group develops made-to-order solutions for various water-related applications. Three examples highlight how we are promoting the responsible use of water as a resource.

Our author
Jan Paulin
Jan PaulinCorporate Communications, Freudenberg & Co.

Water is a precious commodity and is becoming more and more valuable. We have never seen global climate change as intense as what we are seeing now. About 2.2 billion people have no regular access to safe drinking water, according to UNESCO’s 2022 World Water Development Report

The world’s largest seawater desalination plant

The world‘s largest seawater desalination plant, "Sorek II", is being built south of Tel Aviv at a cost of nearly half a billion euros.

After its completion, it will desalinate 100 billion liters of water annually, transforming it into industrial and drinking water for more than 1.5 million people. That will cover 20 percent of Israel‘s water needs.

The Freudenberg Group is supporting the project with long-lasting solutions, namely highly advanced mechanical face seals developed especially for extremely high pressures in water-related applications. They enable reliable, trouble-free operation and make the impact of the facility more sustainable thanks to their long-operating life.

The largest wastewater treatment network in Latin America

In Colombia, a billion liters of wastewater flow into the Bogotá River alone every day. The largest wastewater treatment plant in Latin America is currently being built near the river. Freudenberg is providing highly advanced sealing systems for this massive project, which are being installed in the six wastewater pumps of the Canoas pumping station in the nation’s capital.

 

The sealing systems being incorporated into the huge pumps are quite small by comparison. But they perform a number of tasks. The design consists of two housing halves, and the pump does require complete disassembly during maintenance. “Our seals are among the most important components,” says Freudenberg’s Maximilian Behr. These versatile parts must be reliable, withstanding high pressures and resisting rapid material wear.

Our seals are among the most important components.

Maximilian Behr, Projectmanager and Sales Manager Focus Markets Water, Freudenberg

Every day, 800 tons of waste and dirt can be filtered out of the water. The treatment of the wastewater improves water quality in rivers and promotes energy generation, cleaner air and biodiversity. The project is improving the quality of life of more than 7 million people.

Velvety whisky and clean water

“Glenmorangie Single Malt Scotch Whisky“ – for connoisseurs, the name has a special ring. It has been produced in the Scottish Highlands since 1843, and is now famous worldwide.

The destillery Glenmorangie works hard to limit the negative environmental impact of its processes by cleansing the byproducts of distillation. This includes the wastewater introduced into the Dornoch Firth.

Freudenberg’s Aquabio membrane technology is playing a critical role in this highly efficient wastewater treatment. With the help of special membranes, wastewater is filtered through 16 tubes, each 6 meters (nearly 20 feet) long, in several passes, until it reaches the desired quality. The result is wastewater that is 95 percent cleaner, a level of purity that has hardly any impact on the marine environment.

Glenmorangie whisky has been produced in the heart of the Scottish Highlands on the Dornoch Firth since 1843.

In Freudenberg's Aquabio plant at Glenmorangie, wastewater is filtered in pipes using special membranes.

The heart of the distillery: this is where the fine spirit is produced, which later matures in large barrels.

The purified water flows into the sea at the Dornoch estuary. Glenmorangie is also committed to sustainability and environmental protection here. In collaboration with Heriot Watt University, oyster beds have been established that act as natural filters to clean the seawater.

Slàinte mhath is a Scottish toast that means "to health".

Slàinte means "health" in Gaelic and "mhath" is translated as "good".

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